Directions for Logical Fallacy Project
Read about and research your fallacy. Then (1) define the fallacy, (2) provide an example in text (one different than the example in our packet), and (3) provide a visual (poster, photo, print ad), and (4) provide a video of the fallacy being used. Consider commercials, presidential/local officials' debates or sound bites, sitcom episodes, satirical skits, etc. If you cannot find a visual or a video, create one and upload it onto your page.

Second Block
Fourth Block
Fifth Block



Begging the Question
Begging the Question
Begging the Question
Argument from Analogy
Argument from Analogy
Argument from Analogy
Ad Hominem (Personal Attack)
Ad Hominem (Personal Attack)
Ad Hominem (Personal Attack)
Hasty or Sweeping Generalization
Hasty or Sweeping Generalization
Hasty or Sweeping Generalization
False Dilemma
False Dilemma
False Dilemma
Equivocation
Equivocation
Equivocation
Red Herring
Red Herring
Red Herring
Tu Quoque (You Also)
Tu Quoque (You Also)
Tu Quoque (You Also)
Appeal to Doubtful Authority
Appeal to Doubtful Authority
Appeal to Doubtful Authority
Misleading Statistics
Misleading Statistics
Misleading Statistics
Post Hoc, Ergo Proper Hoc
Post Hoc, Ergo Proper Hoc
Post Hoc, Ergo Proper Hoc
Non Sequitur (It Does Not Follow)
Non Sequitur (It Does Not Follow)
Non Sequitur (It Does Not Follow)

WHY? The BIG Idea
EVERYTHING is an argument! We are daily bombarded with arguments in the media, in the classroom, by our friends and those around us. It is important to be able to recognize logical fallacies in media messages as well as in conversation. This knowledge helps us avoid being manipulated by fallacious claims and learn how to avoid making those claims ourselves.

CONNECTIONS
RI.11.8-2 Students can evaluate the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy.
W.11.6 Students can use technology to produce, publish, and update their own work and shared writing projects.